What’s Your Leadership Wake?


September 23, 2019 Julia Felton

The term wake is a boating term that refers “to the trail of disturbed water that is left as a boat moves in the water.” It can be seen from some distance away, and the size of the wake is typically determined by the speed and the size of the boat. Whatever the magnitude of the wake, the one thing that is certain is that a wake is created. A boat simply cannot move without disturbing the water around it. It’s a physical impossibility.

What Is A Leadership Wake? 

In much the same way as a boat leaves a trail behind it, so does a leader. This is all due to the law of cause and effect. Whenever a leader, or anyone else for that matter, enters into a relationship with someone else, they leave an impact (a wake). Whether this is positive or negative typically depends on the interaction, and also the self-awareness of the leader—and most leaders I know have no recognition of the type of wake they create.

Kip Tindell, cofounder, chairman, and former CEO for The Container Store, notes that:

“Someone who’s very mindful of their wake and has the mature and sobering understanding of how powerful [his or her] wake is . . . the kind of person we want to be connected to.”

The way you show up impacts how others experience you, and therefore the quality of the interaction. If you create a positive wake then it helps team members feel a sense of belonging. Consequently, a leader’s effectiveness, long-term and short-term, is directly linked to the quality of the relationships they have with their team and colleagues.

Leaders that use their position and the company hierarchy to create a big wake often create inefficient relationships that alienate team members; this, in turn, undermines the long-term viability of a company.

Great leaders fully appreciate that when they create a positive wake within the business team members feel more engaged and committed to the company. This, in turn, makes the team members feel happier as they recognize they are valued for their contribution.

The Wake of Non-Verbal Communication

Many people I work with are really surprised by the power of their wake, and are unaware of the fact that all the time they are influencing people around them. Your wake is part of the non-verbal communication that we all emit. Our non-verbal communication is the most powerful form of communication we have—and, according to some research, impacts over 55% of our interactions.

I’m sure you’ve all experienced a time when someone has said they are well, but every other visible sign is that they are not. Maybe they are shivering, coughing, hunched up. These are all non-verbal signs that the person is far from well.

Our energy is also part of the suite of non-verbal communication tools that we typically unconsciously use. Our energy creates a wake simply when we enter a room, and this too can create a positive or negative impact with others. If our energy is too large, we can become intimidating to others; conversely, if our energy is contained, we might appear as rather timid and shy. And whilst most of your team members won’t candidly let you know how they experience your wake, my horses have absolute clarity about this. If your wake is too big and rough they simply will not engage and connect with you; and although your team members might, rest assured they won’t be enjoying the interaction and won’t feel connected to you and the business.

$9.6bn judgment: Nigeria can’t bully us, P&ID


Published September 7, 2019 Ade Adesomoju, Abuja

The beneficiary of the $9.6bn judgment of a United Kingdom court, Process & Industrial Process, has said its Gas Supply and Processing  Agreement with Nigerian would have generated 2000 megawatts had the country not reneged on its part of the deal.

The Irish firm said this in a mail on Thursday in response to an enquiry by Saturday  PUNCH.

P&ID stated that only 59 per cent of the country had access to reliable supply of electricity, citing World Bank’s report.

It added that if the project had been  executed, there could have been “transformative for millions of Nigerians”.

It stated, “Lastly, we mustn’t forget the entire reason for the P&ID contract in the first place.

“It was to take waste gas that was (and still is) being flared into the atmosphere – which is extremely detrimental to the environment and to public health – and process this into feedstock gas for the national grid at no cost to the Nigerian government.

“The P&ID project would have generated up to 2,000 megawatts of power.

“Such a major increase in the electricity supply brought by the P&ID project could have been transformative for millions of Nigerians.

“At present, the World Bank estimates that only 59 per cent of the country have access to reliable supply of electricity.

“The failure of the government to supply the gas is a tragedy for all of those who could have benefitted from the project – and a tragedy for the environment.

“All of this raises serious concerns for foreign investors in Nigeria, whether you are investing in a commercial enterprise or considering buying the next tranche of Eurobonds.

“Not only will Nigeria deliberately refuse to pay an international arbitration award backed by an English court, but they are prepared to launch sham investigations and character assassinations in an attempt to bully investors into giving up their legal rights.”

The firm insisted that Nigeria had the opportunity to settle its liability in the failed contract with only $850m in 2015 before the arbitral award of $9.6bn by the arbitration panel in 2017 but government failed to take advantage of it.

It stated, “In May 2015, prior to the award on liability, P&ID offered to settle for $850m.

“In June 2015, the Buhari administration took power, but did not take P&ID up on their offer.”

The firm also accused the  Buhari administration, particularly the Attorney General of the Federation and Minister of Justice, Abubakar Malami, and his Information and Culture counterpart, Lai Mohammed, of dithering over their earlier proposal of settlement talks.

“As P&ID has stated before, the ball is in Nigeria’s court. If the Nigerian government is serious about a willingness to negotiate – they need to do so in good faith.”

Romans 13:3b-5


Arlin Sorensen's Thoughts on Scripture

In Romans 13:3b-5 Paul begins by reminding us that we are called to do what is good. Paul’s idea is that Christians should be the best citizens of all. Even though they are loyal to God before they are loyal to the state Christians should be good citizens because they are honest, give no trouble to the state, pay their taxes, and – most importantly – pray for the state and the rulers. “Then do what is good, and you will receive his approval, for he is God’s servant for your good.” How much are you praying for our leaders. Paul describes them as ‘God’s servant’ because they have a place in the plan and administration of God, just as much as church leaders do.

Every leader should remember that they are only servants, and not gods themselves. Sometimes people that are placed in leadership allow power to go…

View original post 305 more words

World Health Organization to try New Ebola Vaccine in DRC


September 25, 2019Ayodamola Owoseye

Ebola health workers in Congo

The health authorities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) have announced plans to introduce a second experimental Ebola vaccine, manufactured by Johnson & Johnson, from mid- October.

WHO in a statement on Monday said the new vaccine will complement the current vaccine (rVSV-ZEBOV-GP), manufactured by Merck, which is being administered in the country.

An outbreak of Ebola in the DRC in August 2018 has killed over 2,000 people. Despite the best effort of health officials in the country, the outbreak has not been contained.

WHO introduced the first ever Ebola vaccine in the country earlier this year with appreciable success. The new vaccine manufactured by Johnson and Johnson is expected to complement the successes recorded by the one manufactured by Merck.

WHO said the vaccine will be administered under approved protocols to targeted at-risk populations in areas that do not have active Ebola transmission as an additional tool to extend protection against the virus.

Vaccine interventions

WHO Director-General, Tedros Ghebreyesus said the “DRC authorities, in deciding to deploy the second experimental vaccine to extend protection against this deadly virus, have once again shown leadership and their determination to end this outbreak as soon as possible.”

He said science is the drive for everything they do.

“The advice we were given by WHO’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization (SAGE) in May has been applied, always taking into account community needs and preferences, as we know this will make the approach more effective. The changes made have saved thousands of lives in this outbreak,” he said.

Also, WHO’s Regional Director for Africa, Matshidiso Moeti, said the “evaluation of the second Ebola vaccine will help ensure that we have potentially an additional tool to prevent the expansion of the outbreak and also a potential tool to protect populations before outbreaks hit areas at risk.”

She, however, said the Merck vaccine will continue to be provided to all people at high risk of Ebola infection including those who have been in contact with a person confirmed to have Ebola, all contacts of contacts, and others determined to be at high risk of contracting Ebola.

She said since the beginning of the outbreak in August 2018, over 223,000 people have received Merck vaccination.

The UN health agency said the introduction of the second experimental vaccine was in line with the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization recommendations as are a number of other innovations.

In May, SAGE reviewed use of vaccines in the ongoing Ebola outbreak and issued some recommendations.

These included adjusting the dose of the Merck vaccine, evaluating a second vaccine under appropriate protocols, changing strategies when insecurity makes it difficult to reach people – such as providing pop-up vaccination stations — and increasing the number of people vaccinated within communities with ongoing transmission, sometimes vaccinating whole villages.

Ms Moeti said there was nothing to be scared of because new therapeutics and better use of treatment protocols have also saved many lives.

“To date, 973 people have been successfully treated and released from Ebola treatment centres, and we expect that the 1000th survivor will return to his or her community in the coming weeks,” she said.

Vaccine stockpile

WHO said considering the current number of cases being reported and the doses required to vaccinate each case, the doses available of the rVSV-ZEBOV-GP vaccine are considered sufficient.

Ms Moeti said there are enough vaccine doses on the ground to meet the current needs, with WHO logisticians ensuring a minimum supply of 10,000 doses at all times, and overall supplies of the vaccine are being constantly monitored.

Merck has provided WHO with 245,000 doses for DRC and neighbouring countries and built a stockpile of 190,000 doses that are ready to send to DRC. Merck also aims to release 650,000 doses over the next six to 18 months under its replenishment strategy.

Under the current SAGE recommendations, this means that there are 390,000 doses currently and additional 1.3 million doses will be available.

WHO set to introduce second experimental vaccine to curb Ebola


September 25, 2019 Ayodamola Owoseye

Ebola health workers in Congo

The health authorities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) have announced plans to introduce a second experimental Ebola vaccine, manufactured by Johnson & Johnson, from mid- October.

WHO in a statement on Monday said the new vaccine will complement the current vaccine (rVSV-ZEBOV-GP), manufactured by Merck, which is being administered in the country.

An outbreak of Ebola in the DRC in August 2018 has killed over 2,000 people. Despite the best effort of health officials in the country, the outbreak has not been contained.

WHO introduced the first ever Ebola vaccine in the country earlier this year with appreciable success. The new vaccine manufactured by Johnson and Johnson is expected to complement the successes recorded by the one manufactured by Merck.

WHO said the vaccine will be administered under approved protocols to targeted at-risk populations in areas that do not have active Ebola transmission as an additional tool to extend protection against the virus.

Vaccine interventions

WHO Director-General, Tedros Ghebreyesus said the “DRC authorities, in deciding to deploy the second experimental vaccine to extend protection against this deadly virus, have once again shown leadership and their determination to end this outbreak as soon as possible.”

He said science is the drive for everything they do.

“The advice we were given by WHO’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization (SAGE) in May has been applied, always taking into account community needs and preferences, as we know this will make the approach more effective. The changes made have saved thousands of lives in this outbreak,” he said.

Also, WHO’s Regional Director for Africa, Matshidiso Moeti, said the “evaluation of the second Ebola vaccine will help ensure that we have potentially an additional tool to prevent the expansion of the outbreak and also a potential tool to protect populations before outbreaks hit areas at risk.”

She, however, said the Merck vaccine will continue to be provided to all people at high risk of Ebola infection including those who have been in contact with a person confirmed to have Ebola, all contacts of contacts, and others determined to be at high risk of contracting Ebola.

She said since the beginning of the outbreak in August 2018, over 223,000 people have received Merck vaccination.

The UN health agency said the introduction of the second experimental vaccine was in line with the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization recommendations as are a number of other innovations.

In May, SAGE reviewed use of vaccines in the ongoing Ebola outbreak and issued some recommendations.

These included adjusting the dose of the Merck vaccine, evaluating a second vaccine under appropriate protocols, changing strategies when insecurity makes it difficult to reach people – such as providing pop-up vaccination stations — and increasing the number of people vaccinated within communities with ongoing transmission, sometimes vaccinating whole villages.

Ms Moeti said there was nothing to be scared of because new therapeutics and better use of treatment protocols have also saved many lives.

“To date, 973 people have been successfully treated and released from Ebola treatment centres, and we expect that the 1000th survivor will return to his or her community in the coming weeks,” she said.

Vaccine stockpile

WHO said considering the current number of cases being reported and the doses required to vaccinate each case, the doses available of the rVSV-ZEBOV-GP vaccine are considered sufficient.

Ms Moeti said there are enough vaccine doses on the ground to meet the current needs, with WHO logisticians ensuring a minimum supply of 10,000 doses at all times, and overall supplies of the vaccine are being constantly monitored.

Merck has provided WHO with 245,000 doses for DRC and neighbouring countries and built a stockpile of 190,000 doses that are ready to send to DRC. Merck also aims to release 650,000 doses over the next six to 18 months under its replenishment strategy.

Under the current SAGE recommendations, this means that there are 390,000 doses currently and additional 1.3 million doses will be available.