The Mistrial of Jordan Davis: More Evidence Problems for Denying Racism


radical eyes for equity

In On the Killing of Jordan Davis by Michael Dunn, Ta-Nehisi Coates confronts the injustice of simply being born an African American son:

Jordan Davis had a mother and a father. It did not save him. Trayvon Martin had a mother and a father. They could not save him. My son has a father and mother. We cannot protect him from our country, which is our aegis and our assailant. We cannot protect our children because racism in America is not merely a belief system but a heritage, and the inability of black parents to protect their children is an ancient tradition.

These words—”We cannot protect him from our country, which is our aegis and our assailant”—echo James Baldwin writing in 1966:

This is why those pious calls to “respect the law,” always to be heard from prominent citizens each time the ghetto explodes, are so obscene. The law…

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Imagining a Society where All Lives Matter


radical eyes for equity

The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer.

James Baldwin, “A Report from Occupied Territory,”The Nation,July 11, 1966.

The U.S. suffers from “myths that deform” [1].

As George Carlin quipped, “It’s called the American Dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

At the core of that deforming American Dream is a cultural clinging to individual responsibility and its negative—a rejection of both community/collaboration and systemic forces.

In the U.S., so the story goes, you are successful or a failure because of your own individual traits, regardless of the power of inequities (racism, classism, sexism) to shape your life.

Also necessary for the American Dream and bootstrap narratives to endure, the U.S. has a love affair with outlier antidotes: One black man’s success proves no racism exists.

Idealism in the U.S. sustains offensive slogans such…

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Watching the Watchmen: Should the Public Have Access to Monitorship Reports in FCPA Settlements?


GAB | The Global Anticorruption Blog

When the Department of Justice (DOJ) settles Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) cases with corporate defendants, the settlement sometimes stipulates that the firm must retain a “corporate monitor” for some period of time as a condition of the DOJ’s decision not to pursue further action against the firm. The monitor, paid for by the firm, reports to the government on whether the firm is effectively cleaning up its act and improving its compliance system. While lacking direct decision-making power, the corporate monitor has broad access to internal firm information and engages directly with top-level management on issues related to the firm’s compliance. The monitor’s reports to the DOJ are (or at least are supposed to be) critically important to the government’s determination whether the firm has complied with the terms of the settlement agreement.

Recent initiatives by transparency advocates and other civil society groups have raised a question that had not…

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When the Department of Justice (DOJ) settles Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) cases with corporate defendants, the settlement sometimes stipulates that the firm must retain a “corporate monitor” for some period of time as a condition of the DOJ’s decision not to pursue further action against the firm. The monitor, paid for by the firm, […]

via Watching the Watchmen: Should the Public Have Access to Monitorship Reports in FCPA Settlements? — GAB | The Global Anticorruption Blog

Imagining a Society where All Lives Matter — the becoming radical


The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer. James Baldwin, “A Report from Occupied Territory,” The Nation, July 11, 1966. The U.S. suffers from “myths that deform” [1]. As George Carlin quipped, “It’s called the American Dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.” […]

via Imagining a Society where All Lives Matter — the becoming radical

Camping and Kazakhs: My Amazing Mongolian Adventure — The Insatiable Traveler


It’s been a week since I returned from my trip to western Mongolia with photographer Timothy Allen and seven fellow photography lovers, and my head is still spinning from the adventure. We camped in the Altai Tavan Bogd National Park, a vast and profoundly beautiful and pristine expanse where we met the world’s most tolerant […]

via Camping and Kazakhs: My Amazing Mongolian Adventure — The Insatiable Traveler

Watching the Watchmen: Should the Public Have Access to Monitorship Reports in FCPA Settlements? — GAB | The Global Anticorruption Blog


When the Department of Justice (DOJ) settles Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) cases with corporate defendants, the settlement sometimes stipulates that the firm must retain a “corporate monitor” for some period of time as a condition of the DOJ’s decision not to pursue further action against the firm. The monitor, paid for by the firm, […]

via Watching the Watchmen: Should the Public Have Access to Monitorship Reports in FCPA Settlements? — GAB | The Global Anticorruption Blog

The Inherent Offensiveness of Being a Straight, White, Male in San Francisco — david sasaki


Over the past few months, I’ve experienced something that I hadn’t experienced consistently since the teenage cruelties of middle school. I’ll meet someone new at a party or bar or coffee shop and it becomes immediately apparent that either they dislike me or are intent on showing their disinterest in me. I probably care whether…

via The Inherent Offensiveness of Being a Straight, White, Male in San Francisco — david sasaki

High-profile blogger launches attack on Basset Hound owners


A good piece I dare say.

Bill Pearse

IMG_5606The problem with Basset Hounds is they suck. If you’re a Basset lover, I’m not sorry for writing this, I’m sorry for you. Right now as you’re reading this there’s probably something you need to clean or repair, something that got eaten that shouldn’t have which you’ll need to deal with later. Bassets suck.

We were open to Basset Hounds, my mom and I. My stepdad John had them before we met, and we were surrounded by oil paintings and statues, portraits, pillows, bumper stickers: all for the love of the Basset, the one John had called Hercules, he’d bring to the pub and give a bowl of beer to and the dog would just sit there and drink until it slid off the stool…how John knew the vet from All Creatures Great and Small, the singer from Jethro Tull with his flute, how he adopted their Bassets or vice versa…

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