Anticorruption Enforcement Policy: Insights from the Deterrence Scholarship


GAB | The Global Anticorruption Blog

Over the past three decades much empirical work has appeared on the effect of the criminal law on crime rates.  Usefully summarized in review articles by, among others, Professors Daniel Nagin of Carnegie Mellon University and Michael Tonry of the University of Minnesota (click here and here for examples), this research offers several insights for those engaged in the fight against corruption.

The first is that the criminal justice system can make a difference.  Save for acts committed in the heat of the moment, crime is a cost-benefit proposition.  Would-be criminals tote up the (usually) monetary gains of violating the law against the risks of being caught and punished and, when the benefits exceed the costs, commit an offense.  Thus policies that drive up the cost of crime by increasing the chances an offender will be caught, prosecuted, and appropriately punished reduce the crime rate.  Recent studies confirm that corruption…

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Reducing Court Delays: A Critical Element in the Fight Against Corruption


GAB | The Global Anticorruption Blog

One consistent finding from the research on anticorruption policy is that those tempted to commit an act of corruption can be deterred from doing so if they are afraid they will be caught and punished.  That is the good news.  Deterrence works. But as I noted in an earlier post, deterrence requires a court system that can resolve cases within a reasonable time.  If those contemplating whether to take or pay a bribe or participate in some other form of corruption know that, if caught, they can delay the case for years if not decades, the fear of punishment will be lessened if not eliminated altogether. An effective national anticorruption policy thus requires ensuring cases are resolved without inordinate delay.

Court delay is a long-standing problem in many nations, and courts in any number of jurisdictions have implemented programs to reduce delays. Few, however, have succeeded.  In a…

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New Case Studies on Specialized Anticorruption Courts in Indonesia, the Philippines, Slovakia, and Uganda


GAB | The Global Anticorruption Blog

As is well-known, many countries around the world–especially developing and transition countries–have established specialized anticorruption institutions with prosecutorial and/or investigative functions. These agencies have attracted a great deal of attention and analysis (including on the blog–see, for example, here, here, here, and here). Many countries have gone further, and established specialized courts (or special divisions of existing courts) to focus exclusively or substantially on corruption cases. These specialized anticorruption courts have gotten relatively less attention, but as proposals for such courts have become increasingly prominent in many countries, there is a growing need for close analysis of these institutions.

To meet this need, the U4 Anticorruption Resource Centre has a new project, under the direction of Senior Advisor Sofie Arjon Schutte, on specialized anticorruption courts (a project in which I have been fortunate enough to participate). The first set of publications to result from this…

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[Press Release] TFDP to President Duterte: Marcos’ hero’s burial an insult to Fr. Rudy Romano, enforced disappearance victim during Martial Law


TFDP to President Duterte: Marcos’ hero’s burial an insult to Fr. Rudy Romano, enforced disappearance victim during Martial Law   One of the thousand reasons why Ferdinand Marcos should not be give…

Source: [Press Release] TFDP to President Duterte: Marcos’ hero’s burial an insult to Fr. Rudy Romano, enforced disappearance victim during Martial Law